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Getting Married – Know your Cravat-iquette

Getting Married – Know your Cravat-iquette

Wedding Photography Sussex Surrey Kent Cravat Tying Guide

As you can see from the above graphic, cravats have been around for a very long time and there’s historically a lot of ways that they can be tied.   In modern times, of course, they’ve largely been superseded by the neck tie and usually it’s only at weddings that you find that the cravat makes an appearance.  Of course this means that you might never have actually worn one before so here’s some helpful advice.

There are two main ways to tie a cravat these days – a day cravat which is described as the proper way to tie for an informal occasion (though it’s a little hard to imagine why you’d be wearing a cravat at all if the occasion was truly informal but there you go) and a wedding cravat.  As the name suggests, this is the one you want to master for your wedding day.  Sometimes you’ll see it referred to as a ‘Scrunchie Cravat’ which is just another name for the modern necktie way of tying it which as largely replaced the use of cravat pins.

 

  • There’s no neck size for a cravat – it’s a one size fits all type of situation

  • You can wear a cravat with a regular collared shirt or a wing collar – either works fine.

  • You tie a cravat exactly like you would a standard neck tie, so round the neck, loop it twice then put the long end up the back and through the loops at the front

  • The key to a a good looking of cravat is the level of ‘scrunchiness’ in the knot.  That’s a personal preference as to whether you like quite a tight knot or a puffier one.  The important thing is that the groom, best men and groomsmen all have the same style.  In the case of disagreement about scrunchiness, the groom has the casting vote!

Check Out YouTube Videos on Wedding Cravat Tying
By | 2018-01-31T12:14:28+00:00 January 31st, 2018|Categories: Weddings|Tags: |0 Comments

About the Author:

I am a professional Creative ~ Photographer, Videographer, Cinematographer and Drone Pilot My professional photographic career started at the tender age of 13 when I won my first commission to photograph an art collection by a local artist. It paid £50 which was reasonable money for an ambition 13 year old in 1978. I have continued to take pictures ever since, and quite simply, I couldn’t be happier! I am professionally qualified with the British Institute of Professional Photography (BIPP) and the Society of Wedding & Portrait Photographers (SWPP), and also the Masters Photographer Association (MPA), although I have recently decided to give up my membership of the MPA in favour of the other two associations.

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