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Getting the Most from your Wedding Cake Photographs

Getting the Most from your Wedding Cake Photographs

Wedding Cake Photographs Advice

Offering advice specifically for your wedding cake in terms of photography does sound a bit specific when you are in the process of planning an entire day from start to finish, but it really is worth thinking about.  Your wedding cake is likely to be a fairly substantial chunk of your budget, you will have spent time making sure that it looks perfect to accent your day and you’ll want to remember it in all it’s glory once it’s all been eaten.

Think about the Position

There’s a tendency at wedding venues to tuck the cake away in a corner which  makes perfect sense in terms of you don’t want to risk folk banging into it but it can mean that it is tucked away without good lighting or against an unattractive backdrop.  If that’s the only place for it, then try and make it that there’s a spot that it can easily be moved to for your official cake cutting photos.  You want to avoid having it in front of a window from a photographic point of view and also if it’s a hot day, you won’t want it standing in the direct sunlight (I saw one totally collapse once from this and it was an awful shame).  Also, take a quick look at what’s behind it, your cake cutting shot is one of the anchor shots of your day and you don’t really want to have a big exit sign or fire extinguisher drawing attention.

You’ll Need a Cake Knife

Yep, that does sound a bit obvious but here’s why it’s worth planning a bit. Photographers tend to stage your cake cutting photo for official purposes before you sit down to your wedding breakfast – ‘faking the cake’ we call it.  Quite often, the venue won’t bother putting out the cake knife until the evening for your live action cake cutting which means a bit of chasing around and waiting to track one down.  Or it can mean that venue staff offer you a kitchen chopping knife to cut it with (that happened once!) and it looks like you’re trying to murder your cake rather than make a ceremonial cutting.

Make it Easy to Capture the Details

Cakes with quirky backs  or details are really popular at the moment so give your photographer a chance to capture it by making sure that they can get around all of it.  It’d be a shame to miss out on that cute detail that you invested in because it’s shoved back in a corner and there’s no way to get a photo of it.

Give Yourself some Space

Same kind of thing really but this refers to your official cake cutting photo.  You need to be able to get near to your cake to cut it, the bride stands to the side of the table with her hand on the cake cutting knife first, and the groom stands close behind her with his hand on the top. Make sure you have space at the side of your cake table to allow your photographer to pose up the perfect photo. It’s even better if you can get enough space for the photographer to be able to get a full length shot with your dress laid out as well but that might well depend on your venue size. Get it on your wish list if you can though.

Think About the Tier you Cut

If you’re having a cake with tiers, you might want to save the top tier for your anniversary.  Either way, plan to cut (or stage the cake cutting photo) with you cutting into the bottom tier.  This gives you the nicest angle for your hands without making them look awkward.

Just a little planning can make all the difference to making sure all of your wedding memories are captured perfectly!

By | 2018-04-03T20:01:42+00:00 April 3rd, 2018|Categories: Weddings|Tags: |0 Comments

About the Author:

I am a professional Creative ~ Photographer, Videographer, Cinematographer and Drone PilotMy professional photographic career started at the tender age of 13 when I won my first commission to photograph an art collection by a local artist. It paid £50 which was reasonable money for an ambition 13 year old in 1978. I have continued to take pictures ever since, and quite simply, I couldn’t be happier! I am professionally qualified with the British Institute of Professional Photography (BIPP) and the Society of Wedding & Portrait Photographers (SWPP), and also the Masters Photographer Association (MPA), although I have recently decided to give up my membership of the MPA in favour of the other two associations.

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