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How to Get the Perfect Confetti Photograph on your Wedding Day

How to Get the Perfect Confetti Photograph on your Wedding Day

Wedding photography Sussex Surrey and Kent

While a lot of wedding photography now is unposed and in a reportage style, folk still seem to love a good confetti shot.  There’s just something so fun about seeing the happy couple in a cloud of petals (or a hail of rice!)

From our experience, the best confetti shots are posed by the photographer as, without wishing to diminish the joy of throwing, the photo will always look better there’s a lot of the stuff in the air at one time.  So let your photographer do their job and set it up for you would be the first ‘top tip’

The second would be to check with the venue about what and where confetti throwing is allowed.  Churches don’t usually like it on church property so, if your church hasn’t got a safe (or attractive) spot outside, then you might want to keep the fetti for the reception. Nothing ruins the beauty of the shot like a fuming vicar in the background!

If a venue has strict rules about the type of confetti that’s allowed, then it might make sense to provide it yourself for the guests to throw.  Make sure you mention it as part of the information when you send out invites or on your wedding website so your folk don’t bring contraband confetti with them!  Actually it’s a great idea to provide your own confetti anyway and not just so it matches your colour scheme.  That way you can be sure that there’s enough for everyone and save the few people that remembered to bring along a box sharing it out a few flakes at a time (what do you call a single confetti anyway?)

Wedding photography Sussex Surrey and Kent

Once you’ve figured out what and where you’re throwing then it’s worth getting whoever is handing it out to let guests know not to throw it until told. People are keen and will throw it as soon as they have it in their hands and you don’t want them to run out before your official photo.  Or you can hang a little note on your basket of confetti cones…

Wedding photography Sussex Surrey and Kent

So your guests are all armed with your fetti of choice and your photographer has their attention. You have a couple of choices and these can depend a bit on space at your venue as well as your personal preference.

  1.  The Confetti Aisle – the bride and groom walk down in between two rows of confetti throwing guests.  It takes up more space but it’s a pretty shot and everyone gets a fair turn.
  2. The Confetti Horseshoe – The bride and groom stand in the middle of the guests who are arranged in a ‘horseshoe’ around them with a gap in front for the photographer.  Most people naturally want to face you when they’re throwing but it’s not pretty to get the backs of people’s heads and there’s a good chance will be blocked by an enthusiastic thrower and this way, your guests are in the shot too.

Anyway, your photographer should co-ordinate things for you.  I usually brief people on a ‘one, two, three, throw’ count in to get it all sync for maximum effect.  It tell them to get in close, get a good handful (of confetti) and throw it up high.  Once I’ve got the shot, there’s always people who have some left in hand or who are desperate to stuff it down the groom’s shirt, so I step back from the centre and then capture the rest of the action unposed.

So there you are.  Bet you didn’t know that there was so much to consider in throwing flower petals in the air! Article by Sarah Fisher

By |2018-04-19T09:16:44+00:00April 19th, 2018|Categories: Weddings|Tags: |0 Comments

About the Author:

I am a professional Creative ~ Photographer, Videographer, Cinematographer and Drone Pilot My professional photographic career started at the tender age of 13 when I won my first commission to photograph an art collection by a local artist. It paid £50 which was reasonable money for an ambition 13 year old in 1978. I have continued to take pictures ever since, and quite simply, I couldn’t be happier! I am professionally qualified with the British Institute of Professional Photography (BIPP) and the Society of Wedding & Portrait Photographers (SWPP), and also the Masters Photographer Association (MPA), although I have recently decided to give up my membership of the MPA in favour of the other two associations.

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