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Top 5 Types of Wedding Pew Decorations

Top 5 Types of Wedding Pew Decorations

End of pew (or seating row if you are not marrying in a church but I’ll sticking to calling them pew decorations in this article just for ease) decorations can make the journey down the aisle that little bit more beautiful and also add to your venue styling.  As you would normally leave the ceremony room to continue your wedding day on to the wedding breakfast and reception, it’s a great idea to choose something that you can transport across to form part of your venue decorations for the rest of the day – that way you can enjoy your carefully planned decorations throughout the day and make the most of your investment.

There are lots of choices when it comes to how you decorate the end of your pews, and these are the top five types…

End of Pew Flowers

1. Traditional Flowers – These are the most commonly seen and are very well suited to older church venues.  There are lots of different types to choose from attached the end of the pew by a clip – sometimes, they take the form of balls or wreaths or small sprays but the most traditional are a flat backed display that sits well against the end of the pew and can then be used sitting flat on the tables at the wedding breakfast.

End of Pew Confetti

2. Cones – More recently, it has become popular to hang cones (and these can be made of any material or paper) at the end of the aisle and fill these with either flowers or petals / confetti.  Obviously in a church, it is unlikely that the vicar would agree to confetti being thrown indoors but it is a lovely idea for an outdoor wedding that each guest can throw confetti and fill the air with petals as the bride and groom walk down the aisle together.

End of Pew Lanterns

3. Themed – If you are theming your wedding to suit something dear to your heart, then including your pew decorations as part of the theme is a great idea – especially as it means that the decorations will blend right in when you take them onto your reception. I’ve seen some stunning ones with book page hearts for literary themed weddings, starfish and shells for beach themed wedding and rope knots and balls to add to a nautical theme.

End of Pew Lanterns

4. Lanterns – Lanterns and candles are another way to decorate the ends of your pews and are simply perfect for winter weddings or sparkling in older churches which tend to be darker.  There is something that is universally romantic about candlelight (although obviously it makes photography difficult if it is the only light source) but combined with other lights, it adds a real romance and drama to your venue.  Lanterns can be hung from the ends of the pews (you can use battery tealights if your venue is worried about naked flames) or free standing along the floor or on candle stands.  The good thing about choosing lanterns or candles is that they can be easily transported back to your reception venue and are sure to be appreciated by your guests after dark when incorporated into your reception venue styling. If you purchase rather than hire, then you can also enjoy them around your home long after your wedding day is finished or gift them to special guests.

End of Pew Trees

5. Something Completely Different – Then you can always take a leaf out of the wedding of Prince William and Catherine and think entirely outside the box as they decorated the aisle of Westminster Abbey with full size trees.  OK, that wouldn’t work in most venues but there is no harm in doing something completely different.  I’ve seen some fabulous examples of wedding pew decoration creativity with folded books, lit twig arrangements with a really magical feel, coloured paper lanterns, fruit, wheat and even whole planted live flower arrangements.

By |2017-04-27T15:02:41+00:00April 1st, 2013|Categories: Ideas & Inspiration|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

About the Author:

I am a professional Creative ~ Photographer, Videographer, Cinematographer and Drone Pilot My professional photographic career started at the tender age of 13 when I won my first commission to photograph an art collection by a local artist. It paid £50 which was reasonable money for an ambition 13 year old in 1978. I have continued to take pictures ever since, and quite simply, I couldn’t be happier! I am professionally qualified with the British Institute of Professional Photography (BIPP) and the Society of Wedding & Portrait Photographers (SWPP), and also the Masters Photographer Association (MPA), although I have recently decided to give up my membership of the MPA in favour of the other two associations.

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